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Dr. John Jaquish: The Elon Musk of the Fitness Industry

By The Alpha Human on May 27nd, 2020

Dr. John Jaquish: The Elon Musk of the Fitness Industry

Dr. John Jaquish: The Elon Musk of the Fitness Industry

Dr. John Jaquish is the scientist behind the revolutionary X3-Bar, which uses a unique combination of the world’s most powerful resistance bands attached to a platform and detachable bar, that allows for the type of extreme force that builds muscle 3 times faster than conventional weight lifting, without the risk of joint injury. Dr. Jaquish is also a research professor at Rushmore University, and an expert in osteogenic loading and bone density who has been nominated for the National Medal of Science and who is fast becoming known as the Tony Stark (of Iron Man fame), or more likely, the Elon Musk of the health and fitness industry! As much like Musk’s electric, self-driving cars have disrupted the automotive industry, Dr. Jaquish’s research and his inventions are just as likely to level the health and fitness industry, making gyms as we know them today obsolete in the near future.

Dr. Jaquish credentials belie his physique, as he’s possibly the most jacked and shredded scientist you’ll ever meet, standing 6′ feet tall, he is 240 lbs at 9% bodyfat, having added 45 pounds of muscle over three years using his X3-bar. This is possible due to his invention’s ability to deliver tremendous force throughout a movement at varying degrees. Variable resistance, it seems, is the key to extraordinary increases in muscular growth, a finding Dr. Jaquish discovered while conducting research on human performance and bone density. In that study, his team found that they could create enormous levels of force through the body that were 7x greater than normal when isolating specific ranges of motion.

Later studies confirmed that greater anabolic hormone responses are created with variable resistance vs. the use of free weights or machines. These findings have led Dr. Jaquish to the inescapable conclusion that lifting weights is not only an inferior way to trigger muscle growth but that it is “a worthless endeavor.”

“In the strongest people the strongest. I think it’s like top 5% only use 1.53 times their body weight when they exercise their lower body. Well, compared to nine multiples of bodyweight, which was what the top third of the osteogenic loading crowd was doing. So I just said to myself, weightlifting is a waste of time. Like using the same weight in a weaker range and astronomer range is just nonsense. Like it’s a complete mystery of how the body works.”

Dr. Jaquish’s bold statements and the science that backs them up will soon be presented in his forthcoming book Weight Lifting is a Waste of Time, So is Cardio. Due this summer, he and his co-author Henry Alkire, a biomedical engineer, will present the facts behind how the mainstream strength science and fitness industry have gotten the subject of muscle growth so wrong, for so long.

Dr. Jaquish’s paradigm-shifting discovery, his outspoken views on mainstream exercise dogma, as well as his reliance on facts rather than the marketing hype and “bro-science” prognostications of many in the bodybuilding community have fast led him to become the most hated man in the fitness industry. However, his iconoclastic style, as well as his ambitious nature, has produced an entrepreneurial success story. Dr. Jaquish works with elite performers in sports from the NFL to the NBA, legendary quarterback Tom Brady and the Miami Heat’s Wayne Ellington have both used his X3 Bar, as has Professional bodybuilder and Arnold Classic champion, Cedric McMillian. Dr. Jaquish’s innovations have also attracted many in the business community, including leadership guru Tony Robbins, his partner in OsteoStrong, a pioneering bone density device that has reversed osteoporosis for over 30,000 people and has helped many professional athletes become more powerful, resilient and fracture-resistant. Together they have launched over 300 OsteoStrong clinics across the country, with many more to come.

The prolific rise of Dr. Jaquish and his business ventures is astounding when compared to most scientists who typically only see their work published in journals, rarely do they have the savvy to commercialize their ideas or become successful entrepreneurs. Dr. Jaquish, however, maintains an advantage over many of his peers in the scientific community, as early on in his career he worked in B2B enterprise software sales, where he honed his deal-making ability and saw his drive to succeed rewarded with the opportunity to work on lucrative projects in the financial sector as well as some of the biggest names in entertainment at the time such as Kelly Clarkson, InSync, and Hall & Oats.

Dr. Jaquish credits his achievements and what differentiates his results with many who never realize this level of success with 2 key principles, the ability to take massive action and the acquisition of subject matter expertise …

“Two things I do. I’ve never been asked this question. I love his question. So number one, and I was a practitioner of this and when I started spending some time with Tony Robbins (who) became one of my partners, so many people are fear-based decision-makers. Like they have an idea, and they say, but what if it fails? And I’m like, Who cares? Then at least I’ll know that it doesn’t work, then I have no regrets. And so he (Tony) says, life is filled with people that go right to the edge, and they won’t jump in. And he said this is like 99.9% of the population. He said I see people that come to my shows, year after year, I recognize them. I never learned their names because there are tens of thousands of these people. Tony Robbins will get 30,000 people to show up to a conference, (but) they come so much that out of 30,000 people, he starts to recognize them and sometimes he’ll just grab them out of the audience and he’ll say what changes have you made over the last few years, I’ve seen you in a few of the shows and they go “well I’m planning” or “I’m doing” or “they’re getting ready to” – and there was never action? Never action. You just have to do it … so many people actually have good ideas, but it’s like, if you don’t (do it), (then) on your deathbed, you’re gonna sit there and go, why didn’t I do that? So you just have to, it’s like everybody, all your friends, everyone needs to get out of the way, and just let you do it. And that’s, that’s what I did. But both inventions, people told me don’t do that, with the rare exception of some very successful friends, and that was kind of a good clue to me. And my father is a very successful guy. And he’s always like, let’s try, let’s do it, let’s build a prototype. So, coincidentally, he put the car on the moon. He’s one of the guys who designed and built the lunar rover, so he’s clearly a risk-taker. Yeah, so his idea was just to go for it. But with the medical device (OsteoStrong) many of my fraternity brothers would say, Oh, you don’t want to do that, the medical device industry, there’s billions of dollars there, and If it actually works, pharma companies are going to try to shut you down, which kind of happened, There is a medical establishment, and it’s very difficult to break into, it favors pharmaceutical type studies, so if you don’t have their form of prerequisites, it’s really hard to get recognized the way you’d like to be recognized. But other than that, I mean, yes, there are challenges in any industry. I’m sure somebody wants to revolutionize the shoelace industry. That’s probably a pain in the ass too. So, all these industries are, they want to make sure they’re not competitors. So that’s just the nature business. So number one is, you cannot hesitate. You just have to jump you have to do it.”

“The second thing is, especially when you’re going to be a paradigm breaker with something really disruptive, which I’ve now done in two different industries, right? You got to accept the fact that you’re gonna have a lot of arrows in your back, you’re going to infuriate people, which I don’t care about, I made a lot of noise, so you got to ignore that. But then the other thing is, and this is the important part. You have to do enough background research, that you can speak with absolute conviction that without a doubt, you really understand the subject, maybe one of the best in the world. So When it comes to compression of bone and bone adaptation, I’m one of those people when it comes to crossing biomechanics into cellular adaptions. Most people who studied biomechanics, (like) physical therapists and chiropractors, they don’t take a single class on adaptation, Whereas, sports physiologists study adaptation, and maybe a little biomechanics. But understanding both those elements, and how they really work together, I didn’t want to know the most out of either of those two subjects, I want to know the most about how those two subjects relate. And then that was X3, that was the revolutionary fitness product. And so it’s knowing the subject and being able to speak with absolute conviction, and then just making the massive change to go.”

“I’m gonna give you a sales example. I know a guy who sells a Big Data migration. He’s been doing this for years with Fortune 50 type clients, a for tens of millions of dollars in contracts. And he started in engineering. So, he goes in for an engineering consultation, and he doesn’t do the (typical) sales training approach, he’s got his own method, okay. So he goes in for an engineering consultation, he says, I’m just going to analyze how much money we can save you or, or whatever. And they don’t see him as a salesperson, and sooner or later, they’ll either offer him a job, or they’ll say how do we get started? And he goes, Oh, well, I have a draft contract right here, and I put your address on it. It’s for $20 million though, snd they’re like, fine, you’re gonna save us $50 million, that’s his method. And it’s because he knows the subject. Like what I said with X3, I don’t know the most about biomechanics. I know a lot about biomechanics. I don’t know the most about the adaptation of human cells. I know a lot about adaptation human cells, but as the two work together, I think I know the most about that.”

Full Transcription

Lawrence Rosenberg: Welcome to the Alpha Human Podcast. I am your host Lawrence Rosenberg, and today’s guest is Dr. John Jaquish, inventor scientist, and a research professor at Rushmore University and an expert in osteogenic loading and bone density who has been nominated for the National Medal of Science and who is fast becoming known as the Tony Stark of the health and fitness industry. Dr. Jaquish is the inventor of OsteoStrong a pioneering bone density device that has reversed osteoporosis for over 30,000 people and is now-

Dr. John Jaquish: It’s actually hundreds of thousands of people now [crosstalk 00:00:46].

Lawrence Rosenberg: …thousands of people and has helped many professional athletes become more powerful, more resilient, and fracture resistant. He’s also partnered up with Tony Robbins, a major advocate of the device, and they have so far opened over 300 OsteoStrong clinics with many more to come. Now, as impressive as all that is most actually know Dr. Jaquish due to the waves he’s making in the world of fitness with his second invention, the revolutionary X3 Bar, which uses a combination of resistance bands attached to a portable bar and platform that supports super high loads to build muscle three times faster than conventional weightlifting without the risk of joint injury Dr. Jaquish, welcome to the show.

Dr. John Jaquish: I feel like you work in my office. That was beautiful. You hit everything I could have thought of.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Fantastic.

Dr. John Jaquish: Lawrence, thank you for having me.

Lawrence Rosenberg: It’s my pleasure doctor. So first off, I mean, there are so many inventors out there that have great ideas, devices, inventions, machines that never get off the ground or go anywhere, not even because of the efficacy of their invention. Yet somehow you have managed to launch two incredibly successful products and commercialize them. What do you see as the biggest differentiator between yourself and most who don’t realize your level of success?

Dr. John Jaquish: Two things I do. I’ve never been asked this question. I love this question. So, number one, and I was a practitioner of this and when I started spending some time with Tony Robbins, and Tony Robbins became one of my partners. He put it to words better, but so many people are fear-based decision-makers. Like they have an idea, and they say, ‘What if it fails?’ And I’m like, ‘Who cares?’ Then at least I’ll know that it doesn’t work. Then I have no regrets. Right? And so, he says, ‘Life is filled with people that go right to the edge and they won’t jump in.’ And he said, ‘This is like 99.9% of the population.’ He said, ‘I see people that come to my shows, year after year. I recognize them. I never learned their names because there’s tens of thousands of these people.’ Tony Robbins will get 30,000 people show up to a conference. They come so much that out of 30,000 people, he starts to recognize them.

And sometimes he’ll just grab him out of the audience, and he’ll say, ‘So, what changes have you made over the last few years in your life? I’ve seen you at a few of the shows.’ And they go, ‘Well, I’m planning or I’m getting ready to do…’ And there was never action. Never action. You just have to do it. It sounds cliche. Nike, just do it, right? Yeah. Except when it says, just do it on t-shirt it’s like nonsense. It doesn’t mean anything to anybody, but so many people actually have good ideas. And I know a dentist, he’s a big X3 user, and he’s a good friend. And he told me about some dental tools that he’s been thinking would be great for dentists, because it would save a lot of time. And billable appointment, time is money for a dentist. If you can clean somebody’s teeth in half the time. You making more money? Yes. So, I trying to encourage, no, I don’t know a lot about dental tools, so I can’t help them very much. And it’s not my background.

It’s like if you don’t, on your death bed, you’re going to sit there and go, why didn’t I do that? Right? So, right, because you just have to, it’s like everybody, all your friends, everybody needs to get out of the way and just let you do it. And that’s what I did. But in both inventions people told me, ‘Don’t do that.’ When it was the medical device and I mean, with the rare exception of some very successful friends, and that was kind of a good clue to me and my father was a very successful guy and he’s always like, ‘Let’s try it. Let’s do it. Let’s build a prototype.’ So coincidentally, he put the car on the moon. He’s one of the guys who designed and built the Lunar Rover, clearly a risk taker. Yeah. So, obviously his idea was just go for it. And that’s when I said I was… I got a little allergy, sorry.

Lawrence Rosenberg: No problem.

Dr. John Jaquish: We get into the medical device. So many of my fraternity brothers would say, ‘Oh, you don’t want to do that, in the medical device industry, there’s billions of dollars there. If it actually works. Pharma companies will try and shut you down.’ Which kind of happened, there is a medical establishment. It’s very difficult to break into it, and it favors pharmaceutical type studies. So, if you don’t have their form of prerequisites, it’s really hard to get recognized the way you’d like to be recognized. But other than that, I mean, yes, there’s challenges in any industry. I’m sure if somebody wants to revolutionize the shoelace industry, that’s probably a pain in the ass too. So right. All these industries are reproductive. They want to make sure they don’t have a lot of competitors. That’s just the nature of business. But so, number one is, you cannot hesitate. You just have to jump; you have to do it. And the second thing is, when you… Especially when you’re going to be a Paradigm Breaker, like something really industry disruptive, which I’ve now done in two different industries.

You got to accept the fact that you’re going to have a lot of arrows in your back. You’re going to infuriate people. Number one, which I don’t care about. The people I infuriate. They’re really unintelligent they’re… I don’t care about that, it’s just like at a bird’s anatomy [inaudible] I made a lot of noise, the bird’s pissed off and screaming in the tree. Yeah. That’s all it is. People are. So, number one, you got to ignore that. But then the other thing is that… there is the important part, you have to do enough background research that you can speak with absolute conviction, that you know, when you’re talking about the subjects that you talk about. That without a doubt, you really understand the subject, maybe one of the best in the world. So, when it comes to compression of bone and bone adaptation, I’m one of those people. When it comes to crossing biomechanics into cellular adaptions, as most people who studied biomechanics, they’re physical therapists and chiropractors. Right? So, they don’t take a single class on adaption or adaptation when you want call it that.

They don’t study it. Whereas the sport’s physiologist is studying adaptation and maybe a little biomechanics. So, understanding like when it came to X3, understanding both those elements and how they really work together, was in… I wanted to be… I didn’t want to know the most out of either of those two subjects. I want to know the most about how those two subjects relate. And that was X3. That was the revolutionary fitness product. And so, it’s knowing the subject and being able to speak with absolute conviction and then just making the massive change to go. Yeah.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah. I know Tony Robbins talks a lot about massive action and-

Dr. John Jaquish: That’s true, massive action.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Massive action. So clearly taken out. But what I haven’t heard before from a lot of motivational gurus or those who speak on success is something that you really do learn though, as a… So I’m in the world of sales, I run sales teams and one of the most important things in the world, if you’re going to be able to get get your point across, convince someone, evangelized to the degree that someone is on your side is product knowledge. You have to be just an incredibly steeped in what it is you’re representing in order to create that kind of belief in someone else that would-

Dr. John Jaquish: Totally, here’s… I’m going to give you a sales example that I know. There’s a guy who sells a big data migration. He’s been doing this for years and a huge fortune 50 type clients. So, tens of millions of dollars contracts. And he started in engineering. So, you go in for an engineering consultation. So, he doesn’t do the sales training or what they do at the company at all. He’s got his own method, because he goes in there for an engineering consultation and he says, ‘I’m just going to analyze how much money we’d save you or whatever.’ And then I’ll just see him as a salesperson and sooner or later they’re either offer him a job or they’ll just say, ‘How do we get started?’ And he goes, ‘Oh, well, I have a draft contract right here and I’ll put your name and address on it. It’s for $20 million though.’ And they’re like, ‘Fine, you’re going to save us 50.’ They just sign it. Yeah. That’s his method. Yeah. It’s like, he just knows the subject.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah, that’s powerful stuff. I love those two pieces of insight from you and you know what? The other thing is, it would probably goes along with this and what you’ve said is, actually not just knowing what you have so well that you can explain it with absolute conviction. So, being an expert in it, right? Or close to an expert…

Dr. John Jaquish: You may even, you may even become an expert in something that nobody is an expert. Like what I said with x-ray, I don’t know the most about biomechanics. I know a lot about biomechanics. I don’t know the most about adaptation of human cells. I know a lot about adaptation human cells, but as the two work together, I think I know the most about that.

Lawrence Rosenberg: So, you’ve got that, but then there’s another piece which is, not just believing it, but being it, right? Being it. And what I mean by that is you’re the most jacked and muscular scientist most people have ever seen. Okay. But that’s bottom line. When you picture a scientist, you do not picture Dr. Jaquish, right? I mean, so clearly you practice what you preach and so…

Dr. John Jaquish: You can’t trust somebody who doesn’t, it’s like don’t trust a fat fitness guy. Don’t trust a skinny chef.

Lawrence Rosenberg: I can’t tell you many times I’ve seen fat people in the fitness industry. I mean, funnily enough, my career began 25 years ago, selling health club memberships for Jack LaLanne, right? [inaudible] the day. And I cannot tell you how many of the management staff when I started were all out of shape and overweight. But that’s the thing, but you, so clearly you represent this, well, not just the knowledge base, but physically you can easily embody what it is you’re preaching. I’m curious, first and foremost, how long have you been training for?

Dr. John Jaquish: Well, let me start in the middle. When I started X3, I started doing videos. I was not very good shape.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Really?

Dr. John Jaquish: Well. I’m sure that the non-exerciser there would have said, ‘Okay, you obviously work out.’ But I mean, nobody stopped me at the grocery store and said, ‘How did you get like that?’ Or like now people ask me for my autograph and I’m like, ‘Who do you think I am?’ And they like, ‘Are you an MMA fighter though like I’m not sure who you are, but I know you’re a professional athlete?’ And I’m like, ‘No, I’m a scientist.’ And they kind of look at me like ‘What?’ So, when starting X3, I was okay, I was like 190 pounds, 20% body fat.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay. And how tall are you?

Dr. John Jaquish: Six foot.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay. Yeah. That’s…

Dr. John Jaquish: And now I’m 9% body fat at 240 pounds. So yeah, the product really works. It makes muscle growth. It’s not easy. You know who Dr. Shawn Baker is?

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah, of course I’ve had him on the show.

Dr. John Jaquish: Oh great. Yeah. So, Dr. Baker says ‘Extra workouts are the hardest thing he’s ever done. And he’s a world record holder in the deadlift, record holder in the indoor rowing. So, it’s, it’s really hard a workout, but you do grow muscle quickly.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Hold on. So, you went from one 190 to 240, in what timeframe?

Dr. John Jaquish: Oh, that was about three years. For two years, I’ve put on 45 pounds of muscle and lost 16 pounds of body fat. That was the [inaudible] transformations are always the most aggressive.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah. I mean that…

Dr. John Jaquish: And I’m old and this all happened over 40 years old.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah. I was just going to say, usually if you’re going to see something like that, you see it in a teenager who has the genetics, that they’re 16, they start weightlifting and they just blow up and they eventually get into bodybuilding or some kind of thing like this. To hear about 45 pounds of muscle growth in your forties after three years of training, I mean, that’s impressive.

Dr. John Jaquish: That was two years.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Two years of training. Okay. So, but all right, so now let’s start to understand how is that possible, using the X3? So let’s talk about what that’s all about, what the science of it is, how it works, again the claims that it’s three times faster, the way that sounds like it’s even faster than that with the results that you’ve seen. So, let’s talk about how that’s possible.

Dr. John Jaquish: So, it has to do with looking at the variance and capability of the human body. So, when you go to do a pushup, when your nose is really close to the ground, it’s the harder part of the pushup. And as your arms become straighter, it’s the easier part of the pushup. And in fact, you see like kids in high school cheated push outs, and they only go down like a third of the way, right?

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yes.

Dr. John Jaquish: Especially with the chubby kids. Because they might not be able to get up. Yeah, really sad. When I drive by an elementary school now that’s like advocates of chubby. So, when it’s sad, I don’t want to laugh.

Lawrence Rosenberg: He’s just a kid.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah, it’s just the direction society is going. Yeah. We’ll get into that next. Lawrence Rosenberg: We will but [inaudible 00:18:47].

Dr. John Jaquish: So, when I was developing the osteogenic loading medical devices, what those devices do is isolate the most powerful range of motion. So, where a human would normally absorb high-impact forces and it’s what isolate those positions and then allow them to self-compress. So, they create the force. So, they create force in those positions. And then it’s read with highly sensitive… First of all, the position by a robotic arm. And then they are… Their performance is recorded via a computerized system and sensitive measurement device. So, we captured exactly to the pound, a pound per second, they are creating force.

Lawrence Rosenberg: And this is with OsteoStrong?

Dr. John Jaquish: Its OsteoStrong, right. And I realized when I looked at decondition, as in highly on athletic people, for those who don’t know what deconditioning is. Highly unathletic people who had osteoporosis who were test subjects in the clinical trial that I did in London. There was a hospital in London, and I’m looking at the loading and the doctors that are there. There was the principal investigator that people were really close to the program. And they had already asked all the good questions, but some of the casual observer physicians that were in the hospital would say, ‘What do people do in the gym? Because we’re seeing these little old ladies put five, six, 700 pounds through their hip joint in these very select positions. And they’re moving like two millimeters when they do the movement. So, there’s movement, not static, but they have these… And the movement is actually from the compression of bone. So, the bone actually gets shorter, like the femur does this, compresses from end to end. And so, we’re looking at what kind of loading is going through their…

And the doctors are like, ‘What do people lift in the gym on average?’ And I said, ‘Well, there’s data on that. Let me get it for you.’ And so, I looked at what the American College of Sports Medicine had published in a couple of different journals. So, they do analysis of the NAS database, [inaudible] remember exactly what that acronym is a, the long one, but like National Health and Nutrition or something like that. And so, what they look at is they survey about 1000 people a year and a huge battery of tests and medical metrics that they take in. And so, what they determined was looking at the NAS database that most people go between 1.3 and 1.53 multiples of their own body weight that they load through their hip joint.

Where, so I’m just looking at the hip joint here. Because that’s where there’s the most data on, especially for bone, because that’s where the mortality related fractures come from. So, right. You can have a fragility fracture of your wrist, and it’s very inconvenient. You shatter your hip, you have a… If you’re over 50, you would have a 50% likelihood of death within one year, because of the complications. Yeah. 50% chance of death after 50 if you have a hip fracture.

Lawrence Rosenberg: That’s unbelievable.

Dr. John Jaquish: 50 is not that old.

Lawrence Rosenberg: No.

Dr. John Jaquish: No, that’s terrible. So, that’s why we have so much data on it. So, when I looked at the 1.3 to 1.53 and then I looked at what we were doing, we were doing seven, eight, nine times body weight. People were using nine times their body weight. So, it makes what we do at the gym and the strongest people, I think it’s like top 5% only use 1.53 times their body weight when they exercise their lover body. Compared to nine multiples of body weight, which was what the top third of the osteogenic loading crowd was doing. So, I just said to myself, weightlifting is a waste of time, like using the same weight in a weaker range and a stronger range is just nonsense. It’s a complete misread of how the body works. Now, yes, functionally the things we pick up are one weight. If you have a suitcase to pick up, it didn’t get heavier when you get into stronger ranges, but we don’t carry suitcases for fitness.

We carry them because we have to, what about fitness? What would be the best? And so, I determined that, we need the factor… we need it to match what the research has shown or at least come close to it. So, we have X at the bottom and the weaker range. We should have seven X at the top, we go X to five X or five and a half X. That’s still absolutely hell of a lot better.

Lawrence Rosenberg: And is that the amount… When you say seven X, are you talking about the amount of force or are you talking about the weight itself?

Dr. John Jaquish: Same thing, the amount of force placed on the body. Yeah. You got it. So, we need massive variance. So then I thought, okay, maybe I can just write a book about band training because that’s variable resistance and you can get to some high levels of variance but the problem was bands have been used in rehab for a long time. But that’s because you’re using small joints, small movements, very targeted. Once you get the banding heavy enough to be relevant for strength,

Lawrence Rosenberg: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Dr. John Jaquish: Then this starts to happen. You start to twist joints, that if you stand on a band and try and do a deadlift, you’re twisting your ankles in-ward. And let’s say you’re using a couple of hundred pounds. You can break an ankle. So that was not… Most people would have a neural inhibition. Like their body would just shut off before they actually create a fracture. But it was just a worthless endeavor. It was terrible. So, I just decided, okay, band training is not, it.

PART 1 OF 4 ENDS [00:26:04]

Dr. John Jaquish: I decided, ban training is not it, we got to have something else, and also, I can’t find vans that are even remotely heavy enough. So because now that I know that we’re actually seven times stronger than we think we are, everybody is seven times stronger than they think they are, if their strength is gauged by what they do in the gym. So, what we need to do is find … Now of course, we are using multiple reps. Like one repetition maximums are not good for muscle growth in any way whatsoever. They’re great for neurological system. That’s about it.

And coincidentally, you do multiple repetition [inaudible], and that’s great for the neurological system too. So, nobody needs to do a one rep maximum. So, I wanted to pick a weight where it was very easy on the joints in the weaker range of motion to avoid injury. And incredibly heavy, heavier than we’ve ever trained with. Heavier than we’d ever be able to get into position.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: In the stronger range. And because of our variable capacity, we might be able to train with 20 or even 40 repetitions with that kind of load. Which brings us to a very deep level of fatigue, and that depth of fatigue, the extremeness of the fatigue, is why so much growth is triggered. Because it’s far beyond what you could ever do with a weight. It makes fatigue with weight training look like a joke. And that’s why Dr. Baker says it’s the hardest workout ever.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right. Right, right, right. So … Wow. Okay, so that opens up all kinds of doors, but the first one is, ‘How is it that, especially with your OstheoStrong device, putting that kind of force, that kind of compression, on the bone. So why are we capable of having that kind of force and the bone doesn’t snap?

Dr. John Jaquish: Neural inhibition is the answer to that question.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Can you explain? I understand what neural inhibition is, but for those who are listening who don’t [crosstalk]-

Dr. John Jaquish: It means when you’re uncomfortable and you’re maybe closer to creating an injury, your central nervous system will shut your muscles off or whatever movement pattern off so that you avoid injury. Let’s say you’re sprinting, and your hamstring tightens up. Immediately, you slow down. Not just because of the hamstring but because you start losing your balance, and balance has a relationship with how much muscle is allowed to be switched on. So that’s neural inhibitor. All of a sudden muscle start to shut off and slow down.

So, like when I was playing rugby, and I would go up against some Samoan guy who was just built to hit people, I couldn’t knock him down. All I would do is just shove him real hard and get him off balance. Because he loses speed. And then the rest of my guys would come in and take him in. So that was a neural inhibitory process. I learned that term when I was playing rugby. You know, just to better understand why is it that when I just get somebody off balance, they can’t run.

Lawrence Rosenberg: And so … All right, again so if they’re … It’s kind of like the government right, that prohibits, stops you, well before you’re at your limit.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yep.

Lawrence Rosenberg: And so, our limit is … So, our true strength is so much more than we ever get an opportunity to perform or to realize because of that. So now, how does working with these bands and with the X3 Bar allow you to kind of get that advantage without neural inhibition?

Dr. John Jaquish: Where neural inhibition happens in a weightlifting type movement is in the weaker range. Because that’s where people injure. People don’t injure in the strong range. You don’t tear your tricep in the strong range. Jerry, when your back … when a tricep is in a stretched position. Right?

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yep.

Dr. John Jaquish: So, when you’re using X3, the weight drops way off. So, like when I do a chest press, at the top I’m holding 540lbs. As I move down to the middle of the repetition, I’m holding 300lbs.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: When I get to the weaker range, I’m holding 100lbs. Well, that’s less weight than I would use in a pushup. So, am I going to get injured with 100lbs? No. But check this out. We do … Part of the protocol is you use diminishing range. So, you always keep tension on the muscle, and then you diminish the range as you use the product. So, once I cannot get to 540lbs, and once I have exhausted the fully engaged position of the [inaudible], I can’t get there anymore. So now I just start doing reps going halfway. So yeah, so they might be 8in reps instead of … or 9in, 9-10, instead of a full extension. And I do however many of those I can do until I can no longer get to that range of motion. And then my last three or four repetitions are just using the 100lbs. I’ve exhausted the muscle completely. You cannot do this with a weight.

I mean, even if you rack the weight, and take some of the weight off, and do like a drop set or something like that. Coincidentally, drop sets don’t do anything. There’s research on it. Yeah. Just because … and it’s because you’re losing the hypoxic effect, and you’re starting to recover the muscle in between the sets. So, it’s like turn the muscle on, turn the muscle off, turn the muscle on, turn the muscle off. Is that an intense experience for the central nervous system? No. It’s just confusing the central nervous system, so it doesn’t do anything.

Lawrence Rosenberg: So, you might be the most hated guy in fitness, given all the myths. [crosstalk]-

Dr. John Jaquish: I have a YouTube show, which I’m rebooting really soon, called the Falsehoods of Fitness.

Lawrence Rosenberg: I saw a couple of those. Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah, yeah. There are clowns out there who made a whole career saying, ‘This is how you train just the outside of the tricep.’

Lawrence Rosenberg: That’s right.

Dr. John Jaquish: Or you know, the outer head of the bicep, just this part right here. No such thing. You can’t do that. Nobody can do that. Anybody that has a different shaped muscle than another guy, it’s like a fingerprint. You were born with it. You can make it bigger, or you can sit on the couch and make it smaller. Like, you can’t change the shape. So, guys that try and sell protocols for 100 different variations of exercises are just selling a program. They probably think they’re doing the right thing.

Because what happens is somebody with really tall peaks on their biceps right here, it’s like okay. They have tall peaks so now they’re an expert on the subject. You know? You were born with tall peaks, and you’re an expert on nothing. I can demonstrate that in research. It’s pretty clear. You cannot reshape the body.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Now hold on, hold on. So, all right. So, you can’t isolate specific aspects of the musculature. You can’t isolate one of the heads of the tricep. Drop sets are bullshit. Hold on. What about progressive resistance? Does that build muscle?

Dr. John Jaquish: Well, I mean yes. But I hate the term.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Why?

Dr. John Jaquish: Progressive resistance is not a strategy, it’s a result. Progressive resistance means you’re getting stronger. Right? Because you’re using a little bit more resistance every time. And the idea is you’re using incremental more resistance. It’s like it’s … People say it automatically because they’ve just heard it.

Lawrence Rosenberg: That’s correct.

Dr. John Jaquish: It’s really a totally stupid term. That’s like saying, ‘What do you …’ you asking somebody what do they do for a living. ‘I cash checks.’

‘Really. So, you don’t have to go to a job to get a paycheck? You just cash checks, huh?’ So progressive resistance is a result. It is not a strategy. It is not something you do. It’s almost as dumb as, ‘My strategy is ‘getting stronger.’ That’s how I work out.’ People will just look at you like, ‘What?’

‘So how do you do that?’

‘Oh, I just get stronger.’ Okay, so you’re a moron.

Lawrence Rosenberg: So, what about [crosstalk]-

Dr. John Jaquish: It doesn’t make any sense.

Lawrence Rosenberg: This is amazing. Wait, wait, wait. Okay, so what about forced reps? Does forced reps work?

Dr. John Jaquish: Yes. Forced reps’ work. I wouldn’t do it with X3 because X3 does it automatically.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: But forced reps are another approach, a very non-efficient approach, to variable resistance. So, it’s helping you through some of the harder parts of the movement in the weaker range of motion so you can get more fatigue in the stronger range of motion.

The problem is if somebody isn’t helping you and you need help through the weaker range of motion, that’s where you tear your back, or you tear a tricep, or worse. Like if you’re doing a lower body movement, you could screw up your ability to walk for the rest of your life. So, I mean, it’s not something I would … I don’t lift weights anymore. I think lifting weights is just a worthless endeavor. I would never do it. Because of all of the limitations I just explained.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay, so weightlifting is absolutely worthless, and alongside that of course, same goes for the machines, right? So, whether it’s free weights or machines, a waste of time.

Dr. John Jaquish: I especially dislike machines because … And people have known this just through experience. Like, you go into an NFL training room, and you don’t see any machines. It’s just racks. A rack and weights, that’s it. Like nothing. No leg sled, no nothing. And there was a study a few years ago, and this was actually a reference in my growth hormone study. It was done in 2016. Where we look at what it takes to trigger a growth hormone, and they compared a free weight squat to a leg sled type leg press device.

And even though the people using the leg sled used over two times the amount of weight, they looked at the growth hormone that was created by the exercise. So, the exercisers who … The exercisers who used the squats, they increased their growth hormone by 600%. That’s a lot.

Lawrence Rosenberg: It’s huge.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. And even … So, the leg sled guys used double the amount of weight. What do you think their percentage increase was?

Lawrence Rosenberg: No idea.

Dr. John Jaquish: 0%. Lawrence Rosenberg: Really?

Dr. John Jaquish: Nothing. It’s like they didn’t work out at all. Now, growth hormone is not the full story to the growth of the human body, but it’s pretty important for metabolic function. It’s one of the more powerful anticatabolic hormones. Also, it should … When you’re an adult, it shouldn’t be called human growth hormone. It should be called human repair hormone. Because it repairs a lot of stuff. So, when somebody says, ‘Growth hormone’s not anabolic,’ like there’s some nutrition guy that always says that. Because his nutrition program is very cortisol heavy, let’s just call it that. Basically, he tells people they can get fit eating candy bars. So yeah, smart guy. Just kidding. I won’t name names, though.

Right, so he’s like, ‘Growth hormone doesn’t matter because it’s not anabolic,’ and like wow that is such a misread how that works, but okay. So, we want the maximum amount of growth hormones. So, we want self-stabilized type motions. Now, X3 works even better in that regard with free weights because where the only thing that can attenuate a different level of growth hormone is the weight used.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: Well, the weight you use with X3 is far higher than any weight you could ever lift anyway, with more repetitions. Because the weight climbs when your capability climbs. More capability, the more weight comes on you. So, I was just doing one legged squat with 350lbs on each leg. And like, I know I can … My legs are … They’re feeling it right now. This was about an hour before we started this podcast. But ugh, it’s just such a better stimulus. It’s awesome. And I’m on one leg so I have ever more stabilization firing and even more growth hormone.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay, so speaking about then your training, your actual training with X3, how long do you train for? Like, what’s the protocol? How much time do you spend-?

Dr. John Jaquish: This is another thing people really hate me for, and I don’t blame them for this. Because a lot of scammy products say you can get a workout done in a hurry.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah?

Dr. John Jaquish: So, I work out, I say 10 minutes. Most people can get it done in 10 minutes. I’ve gotten to the point where I’m so big that each muscle … Like in the beginning, it was 10 minutes, and now like my quadriceps, my glutes are so huge they draw so much blood that it takes me a while to catch my breath between sets.

You know, the bigger someone is, it kind of creates the illusion that they have poor cardiovascular health. It’s not true. It’s just they have so much blood drawn into each large muscle that they’re gasping for air. It doesn’t mean they don’t have cardiovascular endurance. They have better cardiovascular endurance than people who are running every day.

But it is manifest in a different way because the engine that they’re using to drive their body, or the engines. I look at each muscle as a separate engine, are huge. So, like, you see a 14-year-old do bicep curls, they’re not out of breath. They can go as hard as they can. Put the weights down, and they take one breath, and they’re ready to do the next thing. Whereas for me, it takes me probably 45 seconds to catch my breath after a bicep curl, so.

Lawrence Rosenberg: So, hold on. What would a workout … Let’s put leg day aside. What would a typical workout with the X3 bar look like on a certain day? What movements would you do, and how long would it take for the total workout, then? If it’s not 10 minutes, what is it now?

Dr. John Jaquish: It’s like 15.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: 15, and it’s four sets. Because you do one set per exercise. You can’t do more than that. It’s so exhausting.

Lawrence Rosenberg: One set per exercise.

Dr. John Jaquish: Right.

Lawrence Rosenberg: And so, let’s say chest. So, chest is one movement, one exercise.

Dr. John Jaquish: We go a little higher reps, too. So, it could be 30 repetitions, 20 repetitions, something like that.

Lawrence Rosenberg: And then what’s the next exercise you do after chest?

Dr. John Jaquish: Overhead press.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: Bicep press. And then I’ll do squats.

Lawrence Rosenberg: That’s all in the same workout?

Dr. John Jaquish: Yep.

Lawrence Rosenberg: And that’s 15 minutes?

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah.

Lawrence Rosenberg: The entire workout?

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. After the squats, I’m usually like … I have to sit down for five minutes and just breathe. Because it’s very exhausting.

Lawrence Rosenberg: So, this is … okay, so a couple of things. Yeah, so of course the entire fitness industry will absolutely just deny that that is possible. Right?

Dr. John Jaquish: [crosstalk].

Lawrence Rosenberg: I mean, you would [crosstalk]-

Dr. John Jaquish: Oh, everybody that sells equipment, I’m sure that half of my trolls go and … they’re working for a big fitness manufacturer.

Lawrence Rosenberg: You put … I mean, this concept, this idea, this fact just puts the entire fitness industry out of business. Just … Right? So, hold on a second. You’re like Tony Stark, but you’re like a radical within the fitness industry. But here’s the thing. What’s really … You reminded me of something. You talk about this one set to the point of such failure that you can’t even stand up. That reminds me of Mike Mentzer and his heavy-duty style of training. They always talk about back in the day. Are you familiar with Mike Mentzer? Are you familiar with that-?

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah? I mean, so-

Dr. John Jaquish: I wish I had met the guy.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Wow.

Dr. John Jaquish: In his last book, he actually said something about how it’s a shame that certain parts of movements are so much easier than others. Because maybe we could change how we load the body and get an even better experience. And it was like, I read that, and well that was before I developed anything. And these are my inventions, and I was like, ‘Yeah, like so this guy saw the future.’

Lawrence Rosenberg: It’s unbelievable.

Dr. John Jaquish: I think he wrote that book and died maybe six months later.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah, it’s a tragic ending. His life … Yeah, he fell into drugs and depression. It was sad. And his brother died, I think, a couple weeks later, Ray Mentzer.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah.

Lawrence Rosenberg: But so, the one set to absolute failure is not just … I mean, that’s the … That is then the most, if you were able to do it, truly exhaust those muscles beyond anything that weights could do.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah, so I use an analogy that even a body builder can understand. Because [inaudible] a lot of them don’t have scientific backgrounds. It’s almost unfair when I give a scientific reference to a guy who just follows body building. Because he’s like, ‘What is all this last names, and a year, and some abbreviations?’ Like, it’s an academic reference. You know, from like school. Like yeah, they don’t know what that is. Like give them a peer review journal. Ever heard of one? No. They don’t. And why would they? I mean, some of these guys are … They might be professionals, but they’re not crossing into anything, any industry, that they would have to read academic references. So, you know.

Also, I think it’s really funny that body building and fitness, the majority of the content is on YouTube. And I’m pretty sure it’s because the majority of the fans are borderline illiterate. Like I mean, they don’t want something written. They’d rather have a video. Really? Because I’d always rather have something written so I could look at the data.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: [crosstalk] the goddamn videos. Somebody sends me a video about data, I’m like, ‘Give me an article. Give me a scientific reference.’ Anyway. So, what was the question?

Lawrence Rosenberg: [crosstalk]-

Dr. John Jaquish: I got distracted thinking about these illiterate …

Lawrence Rosenberg: You were talking about how just one set to absolute failure, and you were going to bring up a reference.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah, and I say that when people are like, ‘You can’t get a workout from one set.’ I say, ‘How many sets do you need to do in the sun to get a suntan?’ They look at me like, ‘Well, you only have to go out once.’ Right. So, if you want cells of the body to change, you just have to give them one stimulus.

Now they wouldn’t know this, but bone is the same thing. One tremendous load exposure to bone, and it starts changing. Immediately. Within five minutes, you can test somebody’s blood, and you can see the pieces of broken down bone that have been sacrificed to make room for growth for new bone, new more dense bone, more powerful bone.

Lawrence Rosenberg: [inaudible].

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. Within five minutes of one load exposure that might last a tenth of a second.

Lawrence Rosenberg: So, this was the discovery that you made with respect to OstheoStrong. So that was actually going to be one of my questions which is, ‘How does that, how does OstheoStrong, how does that equipment that you invented, how does it actually increase bone density?’ And so now you’re … That’s how-

Dr. John Jaquish: Compression of bone. We’re … So when … What happened was my mother was diagnosed with osteopetrosis. This is how I got into all of this. And she was in her 70s, and she played tennis. She gardened and went hiking. She’d go on really big hikes. And I mean, we’re talking like 10-mile hikes. So, she was not deconditioned, but she still had osteopetrosis. And so, she says, ‘Well, I don’t understand why I got this. They tell you you need to be active. I’m active.’ And so, I said, ‘let me look into this.’

Because like she read the side effects of some of the drugs, and she was in tears. She’s like, ‘I don’t want to take this. This sounds worse than a fracture.’ So, I said, ‘Let me look into it.’ Then as I started reading, I said, ‘You know what I’m going to do? I’m going to try and see if there’s a group of outliers out there. A group of people that have built an incredible amount of bone, highest bone density in the world. I’m going to see how they did it, and I’m going to see what they did so maybe we can replicate it for you.’

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: It was one of the easiest things to find. Because this population has … They studied the hell out of them. And I think … Well i don’t think, I know. Because I’ve talked to the top minds in the field. When I got invited to speak four times in a row at the world congress on osteopetrosis, and all the top researchers there. And so when they … When I told them about this population of people with superhuman bone, they would just interrupt me. They were like, ‘Oh, you mean gymnasts.’ That’s right, gymnasts. And they shake their heads. They’re like, ‘We’ve been trying to isolate the growth factors that the gymnasts secrete to create more growth in bone for a long time.’

PART 2 OF 4 ENDS [00:52:04]

Dr. John Jaquish: Need to create more growth and bone for a long time. That’s been part of the pharmacological approach and of course I’m just solving the problem with a flame thrower because I’m just forcing the body to do what happens in the gymnast by compressing the bone physically, mechanically. So, there’s no drug needed. Just do what the gymnast does except with my device, what I did was I wanted to get the benefits of the high impact loading without the risks. So, you isolate those positions with the robotics, and then you allow people to, in a careful and controlled manner, using neural inhibition, because if they’d slammed in something, there’s no neural inhibition. It’s just an abrupt experience. It’s impact. We’re looking to emulate impact, not engage impact. So, in that slow and controlled manner, they can get that experience of high impact loading without the risks. And they grow just as fast as a gymnast does.

Lawrence Rosenberg: That’s unbelievable.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. And women in their nineties will grow bone density, faster than teens.

Lawrence Rosenberg: And how often would they have to do an OsteoStrong workout?

Dr. John Jaquish: The metabolic rate of bone is different than the metabolic rate of muscle, than the metabolic rate of the cardiovascular system. So, you don’t want to do it more than once a week.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Gotcha.

Dr. John Jaquish: One massive load exposure per week. It’s a little like Mike Mentzer too, but for muscle, bone is a throttle to muscle growth. So, the higher, the bone density, you have, the more muscle you’re allowed to hold in your body for obvious reasons. You don’t want the engine to be more powerful than the chassis. It’s like put a Formula 1 engine in a Prius, who’s tearing the wheels right off the car.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. The central nervous system won’t let you do that. So, everything’s very balanced, but you make bone density more powerful, which X3 will do a little bit, but OsteoStrong does a lot. And then you can end up holding more musculature.

Lawrence Rosenberg: So, do you personally use both?

Dr. John Jaquish: Yes.

Lawrence Rosenberg: So that you can continue to use?

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah, I don’t get to use OsteoStrong as much as I’d like to, probably once every other month now.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: So once a week, just because I live in an apartment in San Francisco, it’s a $100,000 medical device. It’s the size of a car. So, I’m not going to put one here, and then not one in my office, but whenever I go and visit an OsteoStrong location, I definitely use it.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah. I mean, that’s absolutely revolutionary, especially considering the elderly population and the absolute plague that osteoporosis is, people don’t realize how dangerous.

Dr. John Jaquish: Dangerous, and as many lives as breast cancer.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah, that’s crazy.

Dr. John Jaquish: Right? It’s the complications. If somebody has a hip fracture and then six months later, because they’d been in bed and they haven’t been able to move around, they started building fluid into the lungs and then they get pneumonia and then they die pneumonia. So, for some reason that doesn’t sound as ominous as breast cancer does. [crosstalk]

Lawrence Rosenberg: I mean, I didn’t know the statistic you mentioned before. I haven’t heard that. That’s shocking about if you have…

Dr. John Jaquish: Big chance of death after 50 years old from a hip fracture.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah. That’s crazy. Absolute crazy. So, you mentioned the idiot, who’s a nutritional regime for people that want to get in shape, candy bars. Right? So that kind of nonsense, what do you eat? Okay, first off, you’re working out with X3, incredible results, GH production at very high levels. Fantastic science behind it. Does it matter what you eat to achieve that?

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: Absolutely. I Mean, basically if you want to grow muscle, protein is what counts and high-quality protein. Low-quality protein like pea protein or alfalfa protein, it only has a one-digit utilization factor. So, your body can only metabolize, let’s say 8% of that type of protein, because it’s got all the wrong balance of, amino acids for muscle protein synthesis. So, you just secreted in the form of nitrogen, you lose it.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay. So, what do you eat? What is your nutrition program look like?

Dr. John Jaquish: Very animal protein heavy, had a couple of pounds of steak, almost three and a half pounds of steak yesterday. [crosstalk] And some ground beef a little bit earlier here, and then some filets later.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay. So, it’s mostly carnivore? Dr. John Jaquish: I have some chicken after my workout. Chicken’s not my favorite, but there’s a new Curry place down the street, so I want to try it. And my girlfriend’s giggling. [giggling] Son I had a little bit of the Curry chicken and then, and then tonight, another couple of pounds of steak.

Lawrence Rosenberg: So, it’s mostly carnivore diet, right?

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. Lawrence Rosenberg: So, and clearly our friend, Dr. Sean Baker is the face of the carnivore movement. Right?

Dr. John Jaquish: Sean and I are good friends. We talk about our workouts all the time, talk about our nutrition all the time. We’ll talk about farming all the time. So, we both want to be big advocates of responsible farming that treats animals a better way, also decentralizing the farming so it’s not just 3 big factory meat companies that control all the meat.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah. Dr. John Jaquish: I have a friend who’s in the meat distribution business, and he has mentioned to me that he thinks this whole meat shortage thing, is kind of fake news and that they’re holding back to drive the prices up, they’re taken advantage. Totally possible. I don’t know if that’s true or not true, but it’s a theory from a guy who’s been in the industry a long time.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Oh, Yeah.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. I mean, as a distributor, he doesn’t care because he’s buying it for more and selling it for more.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: So, he still getting the same margin. It’s just that people they’re not going to quit eating it, so please pay more for it. So, yeah.

Lawrence Rosenberg: But the amount of meat that we consume is almost nothing these days, it’s absolutely at historical lows, the amount of meat, right? That the population is consuming.

Dr. John Jaquish: People are weaker and fatter than ever.

Lawrence Rosenberg: There you go. Correct.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. I mean it was very interesting. Cause I came at this through a very non-biased way when I was doing just OsteoStrong, I really didn’t pay attention to my nutrition. I mean, I didn’t eat apple pie every day, but I was Ketogenic, I guess. So, I guess I did pay attention to my nutrition.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay. Dr. John Jaquish: But I think basic Ketogenic nutrition is so easy, it’s almost effortless.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Dr. John Jaquish: You have more protein and fat. And then I love Dave Asprey’s book. Cause in the very end, you should be eating a majority of vegetables. The whole book telling me the opposite of that. Your conclusion is you should have like seven servings of vegetables a day. I was totally disappointed when I got to read that book. And I think he just put that in there.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Covering his ass.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah, to kind of keep from being beat up. But I almost have no vegetables.

Lawrence Rosenberg: What about carbs?

Dr. John Jaquish: Very limited amount of Carbohydrates, very limited. And then, and of course I try and have those in a window, like right after the workout. So, you replenish your glycogen.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: Even bodybuilders know that trick.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Well, they got one trick right.

Dr. John Jaquish: I’m sure they couldn’t explain why it works, but some of them could, as long as there’s the video that shows them how to do it, nothing written. Right. So basically, or maybe a little bit of rice after a workout for glycogen, and then the rest of it just carnivore.

Lawrence Rosenberg: That’s powerful. So, I wanted to actually ask you a question that I forgot to ask when we were talking about Mentzer and inventions. So again, we’ve established that free weights are a waste of time. The machines are even worse, but what were your thoughts about Arthur Jones and Nautilus? Is that just as much garbage as everything else?

Dr. John Jaquish: No. Arthur was great.

Lawrence Rosenberg: That’s what I want to hear.

Dr. John Jaquish: He was so brilliant.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah.

Dr. John Jaquish: I’ve read every word that that guy has written 20 times.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Wow.

Dr. John Jaquish: Hoping that there’s something implied that was a message to me. My admiration for Arthur Jones is almost on a spiritual level.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Wow.

Dr. John Jaquish: That guy, he understood that the body has variable capacities to create force, which is training variable resistance. He just didn’t get the ratios right. You know, he would use X at the bottom and 1.2 X at the top. Whereas if he had seen my research, the guy probably would have grown three feet taller because it was like, ‘Oh, this is the actual documentation of maximum capability in the most powerful ranges of motion, the gymnastics research, the impact absorption research.’ So, then we probably would have worked together on this. So, to look at how we could really grab a hold of weak range to strong range and exhaust the whole muscle through one experience. And it was like he was going in the direction that I went. I think his ultimate conclusion would have been X3. He just didn’t live long enough.

Lawrence Rosenberg: That’s amazing. Absolutely amazing.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. Yeah. And also, he pretty much taught Mentzer everything Mentzer was [crosstalk] yeah.

Lawrence Rosenberg: That’s right. That’s right. So one other question, and then I want to just move into just something a little bit different akin to the first question I asked you, because I really want to understand a bit more about your psychology and your success and how you view that kind of thing. But one last question about physical fitness and how this all relates to getting in great shape and being vibrant and healthy and strong. The biggest domino I’ve heard you topple is this whole idea about cardio. So, everyone you talk to in fitness, cardio is an absolute must. There are those that are going to say, it’s for heart health. There are those that are going to say it’s to lose body fat, but there is almost no one saying you don’t need to do cardio. You shouldn’t cardio. And then they even come up with, ‘Well, steady state cardio burns fat but if you do sprints, that’ll really get your ripped.’ I mean, there’s all kinds of stories where I’m like, ‘Everyone should be doing cardio’, but I’ve heard you just completely topple that dogma. Tell us about cardio.

Dr. John Jaquish: Let me start with the high intensity intervals.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: The high intensity intervals are effective for accelerated loss of body fat. Not because of what’s going on with the cardiovascular system. It’s because the faster you move, the more stabilization firing and what do we get from stabilization firing? Growth hormone.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Wow.

Dr. John Jaquish: Right. Look at the skull of a sprinter. It looks like it’s lined up with a laser. The whole body is moving. They’re throwing their hand back. So, their twist to the pelvis is more, so the foot strike can have a longer stride.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: The whole body’s moving yet, the skull is absolutely still because they’re not trying to conserve energy. They’re trying to maximize energy expenditure to propel themselves as fast as possible. Whereas someone who is running distance, not doing intervals, doing steady state cardio, you see their skull bobbing up and down because they’re trying to minimize the amount of energy usage.

So, they don’t need to stabilize the skull. They don’t need to switch on more muscle. In fact, they’re trying to switch on less muscle to use less energy. So, if you look at the stance of a distance runner, they’re kind of leaning forward, they’re sort of perpetually falling and catching themselves with the next stride, which is short, very short strides,

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: Right. So, the answer is growth hormone, it stabilization firing.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Wow.

Dr. John Jaquish: It’s got absolutely nothing to do with the cardiovascular system. So, I would say use X3, cause you get the maximum amount of the stabilization bar. When I do an overhead press and I’m holding 150 pounds over my head with X3. Well, what’s my core doing? Well, my core is just vibrating, it’s a jackhammer. That’s all stabilization firing, my growth hormone is going through the roof. So, that’s a sprint right there.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Dr. John Jaquish: Same thing. The body doesn’t know the difference. It doesn’t know far you went. Now, if you want to do it without strength training, jump rope. Every time you hit the ground; every stabilizer has to fire to keep you from tipping over like a bowling pin.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: You ever seen guys who were boxers, and are like, ‘The only way to get ripped is jump rope.’ And that’s been around since the 1960s and people laugh at, and it’s like, ‘You’re hopping a millimeter off the ground and not doing anything.’

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: It’s the anything, define anything. Something very profound and is happening in that tiny loop of movement. And it’s an up regulation of growth hormone.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Amazing.

Dr. John Jaquish: So that’s why lipolysis is so aggressive. So, okay. We address the interval and sprint time in strength training. Now, Yes. Social media has shown us, and this is true of very many subjects, nutrition, fitness, politics, people want to read and see the bullshit they already believe is true. That’s why whether you like the president of the United States or not, I have a lot of friends, I live in the people’s Republic of San Francisco and a lot of people live here. I’m not even a guy who’s radically on one side or the other.

I pretty much think stupidity is universal. And I laugh at some people, especially some of my friends who, they’ll find an article and I’ll be like, ‘Oh, you did some research to find this article.’ And they go, ‘yeah’, they’re proud of themselves. And I got like, ‘What did you type? Trump is a jerk?’ Is that your scientific search term? You’re an idiot. You’re not going to find anything worth reading if that’s the way you’re researching. But think of heavy people. There’s a lot of heavy people that go to look for a weight loss program out to lose body fat while eating Twinkies.

And this guy I was talking about earlier, a guy that says, ‘Eat candy bars and you lose all the weight you want.’ That’s how he sells his programs. I mean I don’t have a picture of all of his users, he doesn’t even have that, but you got to think like anybody with a brain knows it’s not true. Or he’s putting them in a core deficit, so they’re actually losing muscle instead of body fat.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: Which is what bodybuilders are really good at. They get in great shape and they’re like, ‘I gotta cut.’ And then they go on a really aggressive calorie deficit and they lose just as much muscle as they do body fat. So, when somebody asks me, why don’t I do cardio, I say, ‘Well, there’s actually no such thing as cardio.’ So, it’s not that I don’t do it. I train my heart. I have better cardiovascular endurance than many distance runners. In fact, when I do the whole battery of tests, there was a test I did at some kind of multi physician clinic that had all kinds of physical performance. It was in New Jersey.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Dr. John Jaquish: Basically, they were going to give you your physiological age.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay

Dr. John Jaquish: And I’m not a kid anymore, but they told me I was physiologically 19 years old.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Jesus.

Dr. John Jaquish: I thought it was pretty cool because of my lung function, my cardiac function, my muscular strength function, blood work, C-reactive proteins.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: You’ve got inflammation markers in the blood, whole battery of tests. And yeah, so it just determined that I was as healthy as an athletic 19-year-old. And the reason I bring that up is for the cardiac health. Strength training is cardiovascular training, but people are confused because the bigger a muscle becomes, the more blood it draws, which creates the illusion of poor endurance. So, the ability to run 20 miles and the health of your heart are two unrelated subjects, right?

Lawrence Rosenberg: Unbelievable.

Dr. John Jaquish: I mean, if you see a 240-pound running back in the NFL, can that guy run 20 miles? Absolutely not. You think he has good cardiovascular endurance? Absolutely he does. So, he just can’t run as far, but it doesn’t speak to how much blood his heart can pump with efficiency.

So, there were a couple of studies. I mean, these are double blind, randomized controlled trials.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: Really good studies looking at cardiac function in strength athletes and in endurance athletes. And the reason I say there’s no such thing as cardio, is cardio is just really bad strength training that makes you weaker instead of stronger because it shoots cortisol up and cortisol does two things, protects body fat. So, it keeps you fatter longer.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: And sacrifices muscle mass. So, when people do a lot of cardio and they lose weight, they’re losing muscle. And then of course the less muscle they have, the more impact is felt in the joints.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Dr. John Jaquish: As opposed to discharged. You got to think your muscles are like shock absorbers for when you contact the ground or contact anything, but you’re making those shock absorbers weaker and putting more force into the bone and the tendons and the ligaments. So joint damage, rapid loss of muscle, protection of body fat, if not gaining more body fat.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: It’s the opposite of what everybody wants. Now, of course, if you want to be a marathon runner, there’s only one way to do that. You go run marathons.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yup.

Dr. John Jaquish: But don’t be fooled into the idea that you’re going to look like an NFL running back by running marathons, not going to happen. It’s two opposite directions

Lawrence Rosenberg: Completely, completely unrelated then completely unrelated.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. And if you ever see a running back who decides to go run marathons, his physique disappears, it just turns into a really feeble looking guy.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah. I mean, I of course fell into the myth that it’s a great way to lose body fat years ago and couldn’t understand why I had [crosstalk] less muscle and more body fat from running seven miles a day. But what you were talking about before is cognitive bias, right? You look for information that supports, right, your preconceived notions. And it’s almost like everything we’re talking about here is the opposite of popular knowledge, right? Conventional wisdom is.

Dr. John Jaquish: There’s not a lot of wisdom in conventional wisdom.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Exactly. Amazing stuff. So, outside of what you’ve accomplished so far and what you’re doing now. I mean, clearly, you’re super passionate about it. You’re super knowledgeable about the benefits of X3 and OsteoStrong, you’re actually living this truth and a great representative for the brand and for the inventions that you’ve created. So where does Dr. Jay Quish go next? Right? I mean, you’re a guy that hangs out with Tony Robbins, your very success oriented, so what’s next for you? Are you working on any other inventions? Where do you see yourself going from here over the next 5 to 10 years?

Dr. John Jaquish: Well, I still have to be the guy who’s driving the science of Osteostrong and the science of X3.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Dr. John Jaquish: So, I have some big tasks in front of me with my two current ones, but there’s some products on the way, for sure.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Really. That’s exciting.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah, and some of them may be in places that people are really surprised.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Really?

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. Yeah. I’ve.

PART 3 OF 4 ENDS [01:18:04]

Dr. John Jaquish: … Yeah. Well, I have 300 patents worldwide.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Really?

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. So, I got to get some patents nailed down. The first step is just exploring that you can get a patent.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yes.

Dr. John Jaquish: Here’s a couple of things I’d like to do. I made, I would say, myself and my co-author Henry Alkire, we’re coming out with a book in a couple of months.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah, it’s already in final revisions. In that book, we lay out something really profound about time restricted eating. And it’s something that when we discovered it in clinical literature, but researchers didn’t know what it meant. So, it was described as like, we don’t know what this means, but we found this, and I read it and I’m like, I know exactly what that is. Time restricted eating. So right now, what I’m doing is I’m eating in a four-hour window.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: Kind of a late lunch and an early dinner.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: But then I don’t eat anything for 44 hours after that. So, two day fasting period. And sometimes I’ll even go like three days.

Lawrence Rosenberg: So, hold on, you’re 240 with the body fat that you have, and you’re going 44 hours, sometimes even three days fasting, holding that kind of muscle?

Dr. John Jaquish: You don’t lose muscle when you fast.

Lawrence Rosenberg: I love this.

Dr. John Jaquish: You just lose body count because you grow from skyrockets because it’s the anti-catabolic. Basically, your body’s saying, we’re not able to get a meal right now so the last thing we want to do is make this guy weaker because he’s got to be able to catch the food. So, let’s go into body fat stores, right? I mean, I just get leaner or stay lean by doing that. And then when I eat, this is what the big discovery is, and this is what some new products maybe focused around.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: There is very strong evidence, incredibly strong evidence that after you don’t eat for a significant period of time, 40 plus hours, you eat something, and there is a massive anabolic effect, way beyond growth factors we’ve mentioned so far.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Wow.

Dr. John Jaquish: So, by doing this … So, my second year of X3, I’m going on 15 pounds. My third year of X3 I put on 20 pounds, I’ve actually gained more this year than I did last year.

Lawrence Rosenberg: I mean, you look bigger, I’ve seen pictures of you, you definitely look like you’ve put on more mass.

Dr. John Jaquish: No.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Crazy.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Absolutely crazy. I’m looking forward to hearing about this. So, you said you’re coming out with a book or a paper, what was it?

Dr. John Jaquish: A book. It’ll be a 300-page book with over 250 scientific references.

Lawrence Rosenberg: When is it coming out?

Dr. John Jaquish: Three months.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Three months. Have you named it yet? Is there a name for it?

Dr. John Jaquish: Oh yeah. Weightlifting Is a Waste of Time and So Is Cardio.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Seriously, is that the name of it?

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah.

Lawrence Rosenberg: That’s fucking brilliant.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah, the four words written by Forrest Griffin. I have an endorsement from the Miami Heat, but they’re not using weights, they’re just using X3.

Lawrence Rosenberg: That is awesome.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. There’s a lot of pros. I got endorsements from Ben Greenfields, from a medical doctor at NASA. And actually, she’s at SpaceX at the moment, they’re doing sort of an internship program. Doctors and the scientific community were very leery about my claims of osteogenic loading because it steps on some toes in that field, right?

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: But when it comes to strength and musculature, so the two greatest drivers of long life are being strong and being lean.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: Those are unrefuted. Whereas like someone says, ‘Oh, eat vegetables or don’t eat vegetables or eat meat or don’t meat,’ there’re all kinds of conflicting research, mostly because in Nabisco because they know vegans don’t actually eat vegetables they eat like-

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: Cookies and crackers and candy bars and shit.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: We all know.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Well, I mean, [crosstalk] that’s what it says, right? It says vegan friendly.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah, every candy bar, it says vegan friendly. Yeah, whoever decided that should be okay, that guy should just get thrown down in one flight of stairs. But yeah. So, where was I? We were-

Speaker 1: Vegans.

Dr. John Jaquish: Lost my train of thought. Yeah, it was before that. Yeah, just things covered in the book and it’s definitely going to rattle some cages, but like you said, I’m already the most hated guy in the fitness industry, so …

Lawrence Rosenberg: You might as well push it further. Yeah. I mean, it’s really exciting. I can’t wait until that book comes out. So just a couple more questions for you, Dr. Jaquish, okay-

Dr. John Jaquish: No, you said it right the first time, it’s Jaquish.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Jaquish.

Dr. John Jaquish: You changed it later on, Jaquish, so like Jake and wish.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Got you. Thank you, Jaquish. So,

Dr. Jaquish, do you have like a daily routine that you follow that kind of keeps you … You hear a lot of people that are highly successful. One of the things that they’re really big on is having like a daily routine that they practice, whether it’s when they first wake up or at some point, and clearly one of your huge daily routines is using X3 and training, but is there any [crosstalk]

Dr. John Jaquish: So, I’m not as routine-based as I would like to be, because up until just a few months ago, I was flying 200,000 miles a year because Osteostrong is in eight different countries. So, I’m flying to Australia, Iceland, United Kingdom, Sweden. And right before that, I was doing a lot of business in Finland and in Russia, I don’t make anything in China anymore, but I used to years and years ago. So, having a routine when you travel that much, is like, it’s just not happening. So, I’m getting a little bit better about that now. Now, X3 had to fit in wherever it fit in with [inaudible] So that would kind of suck because I’d be there to support the local clinics, and I don’t like working out first thing in the morning, it’s not my thing.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. I’m not nearly as powerful as if I can get a little bit of caffeine in me and start moving a little bit and feel a little more coherent.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: It’s just the way I am.

Lawrence Rosenberg: So, when do you usually train, what time of the day do you usually train?

Dr. John Jaquish: Noon.

Lawrence Rosenberg: And is it fasted training or have you eaten something?

Dr. John Jaquish: Oh, it is.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Always fasted.

Dr. John Jaquish: You don’t want anything in your stomach when you train because it’s just, less blood would go to the muscle.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Absolutely. Yep.

Dr. John Jaquish: Well.

Lawrence Rosenberg: So, what motivates you? Like what inspires you?

Dr. John Jaquish: There’s a couple of people that inspire me. I have a pretty sweet girlfriend and you can probably hear her giggle, and she’s over there. I admire her a lot because she’s sweet, I am not sweet. So, like really trying to be a little more like her sometimes.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. Maybe instead of telling somebody that they should probably fall down a long flight of stairs, maybe I’ll just be like, yeah, you and I just disagree. Yeah. So, there’s a lot I admire people that have some [inaudible]

Lawrence Rosenberg: Wo.

Dr. John Jaquish: My zoom background is a small child made out of ground beef, let me change that. Do you see the eyes? It’s terrible. I clearly did not have a serious phone call on zoom. Damn it, how do I fix this?

Lawrence Rosenberg: It’s amazing.

Dr. John Jaquish: Okay, virtual background here we go. There we go.

Lawrence Rosenberg: All right, we’re back. Excellent. So we were talking about the type of people that inspire you, I mean, you’re clearly super confident, very passionate, you seem very driven as well, have you always been this driven to do the thing … I know you talk about not having the fear of taking action but going for it, you said your father is a very successful father, what were some of the lessons that you took from him and have you always been this driven?

Dr. John Jaquish: I think when you’re excited about something, there’s just nothing better, like, I can’t help it. Now, I’m also very black and white, either I’m very excited about something or I just don’t care. Like somebody talks to me about the economy, I’m very excited about politics and economics though we won’t cover that subject now, but it’s like, I’m into it, I pay attention to it, I try and understand as best I can.

But at the same time, somebody could talk to me about Buffalo migration or something and I’m like, dude, no [inaudible] Unless they’re dying off or something, I’m not [inaudible]

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yes, it’s easy to be driven when you’re excited about something.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. And I just try to work on things I’m excited about.

Lawrence Rosenberg: So, what were you doing before? You came up with the idea to help your mom and you did this research. What were you doing?

Dr. John Jaquish: I was doing software sales, enterprise software sales. Working for a B2B solution, customer relationship management type thing.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Wow. Dr. John Jaquish: In both financial services space and in entertainment space. So, my earlier clients were Kelly Clarkson, NSYNC.

Lawrence Rosenberg: What?

Dr. John Jaquish: Hall & Oates.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Really?

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. That was fun. It was fun, giving the customers a great experience. So like Hall & Oates, they kind of made a comeback, I don’t know, when was that? 15 years ago. And we launched some digital products for them, which helped build relationships with their customers. And so, we were instrumental in their comeback.

Lawrence Rosenberg: I love that.

Dr. John Jaquish: So that’s what I was doing. And I mean, was I excited about that? Yeah, but not like this.

Lawrence Rosenberg: And what lessons did you take from your dad that you think have helped you achieve what you’ve achieved?

Dr. John Jaquish: It’s really tough. He’s a really interesting guy and he knows a lot. One of the things I got from him is he has no fear of public speaking. And I think everyone’s born with a fear of standing up in front of everybody saying something because nobody wants to look like a dummy. Nobody wants to be wrong. Nobody wants to look silly. Nobody wants to be the guy who people go, God, look at this jerk. My dad was just fearless when it came to that and I’d go to conferences where he would speak, and there were just hundreds of people there hanging on his every word, and I just admired it. And I just decided that I was going to be just like that.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Really?

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. That was important to me, for sure.

Lawrence Rosenberg: And I think that kind of ties into what you said about, not having that fear, taking action, doing it anyway, you really do come across as … I think there’s a book, I forgot the name of the author. I forgot her name, but it’s The Subtle Art of Not Giving A Fuck, I don’t know if you’ve heard of that.

Dr. John Jaquish: My girlfriend has, do you know the author?

Speaker 1: No, I can [inaudible]

Dr. John Jaquish: No, no. Yeah, I’ve definitely seen the book.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah. That’s kind of how you come across. I mean, it just doesn’t matter to you.

Dr. John Jaquish: Successful people don’t, like Elon Musk gets criticized all the time and he’s constantly doing things that people said he could never do. I really admire that guy for that. Not just for his electric car.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: I mean, it’s not my style. I wouldn’t want one. I drive a Lamborghini.

Lawrence Rosenberg: I’ve seen those.

Dr. John Jaquish: Yes. But that guy just doesn’t care. Steve jobs just didn’t care.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: Like him or not, our president just doesn’t care. He still doesn’t care when somebody criticizes him for doing something, he’ll do it four or five more times. And I got a strange feeling he’s a lot more popular than people think he is.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah. I think-

Dr. John Jaquish: I think the elections are going to come around and people are going to be like, oh yeah, everybody hates the president. And they’re going to find out that really not a lot of people hate the president. 10% of the really loud people do, but nobody else really does because he didn’t get elected gentlemen of the United States, he got elected president of United States and leadership sucks. It’s not a fun job. So, he’s got to make tough decisions and when you make a policy decision of any kind, and this is true of any president. I felt sorry for Obama. Like everything he would do, half the country would be like, oh yeah, this guy, let’s throw him out. Like what a thankless job. But anyway, my point is you can’t give a fuck.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Powerful advice, man. Powerful advice. So, Dr. Jaquish thank you so much for showing up here and kind of-

Dr. John Jaquish: [inaudible] this is great.

Lawrence Rosenberg: No, man, I’m telling you just like, you’re a very genuine guy, successful as you are, and it’s kind of awesome getting some insight into your thoughts and how you think and what it is that you’ve achieved so far and what it is you’re going to achieve because I’m very confident that some other big things that would be coming from your endeavors and it excites me. So where can our listeners follow you if they want to follow you and [inaudible]

Dr. John Jaquish: Well, if they’re interested in the products, they can go to Jaquishbiomedical.com.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Okay.

Dr. John Jaquish: That’s J-A-Q-U-I-S-H or X3bar.com, most people are looking for X3. And then on social media, it’s Dr. John Jaquish on Facebook and then Instagram, it’s D-R-J-A-Q-U-I-S-H. And I give away a lot of, sort of free health advice on Instagram and Facebook. So, follow me on either.

Lawrence Rosenberg: And you’ve got to re-launch that show you were doing about-

Dr. John Jaquish: Yeah. It’s funny, I was so anti YouTube because I just look at the comments on YouTube and I just think, who are the inmates who they let have computers? Like these guys are just garbage human beings, but it’s a combination between the sort of jealousy driven nature of the fitness industry, by the way, medical industry has no trolling whatsoever. It’s hilarious. Like sometimes the doctor will show up with a serious question, and then you answer that question with data and they’re like, thank you very much. I’m definitely going to recommend your solution to my patients. That’s like the hardest conversation you have in medicine. But fitness, talking to the average, not really bodybuilding, but bodybuilding fan, is sort of like playing chess with a pigeon because what’ll happen is you’ll win and then they’ll knock over all the pieces, shit on the board, puff their chest out and act like they won the argument.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: Even though they don’t even understand the words being used in the argument. Like most of these people are unsavable.

Lawrence Rosenberg: right.

Dr. John Jaquish: So, I really didn’t like YouTube because of that low level of intelligence that is just notorious there. And like I said, fitness is so jealousy driven, so ego driven, who looks better than who, who has better abs than who, which is also not science, who cares? Like that’s ridiculous.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right.

Dr. John Jaquish: But anyway, it’s just gotten such a nature like that, but I’m doing it anyway.

Lawrence Rosenberg: You got to do it. It was great little show, I enjoy that. And when your book comes out, I mean, that’s perfect segue for that show. And I got to tell you one last thing, I’ll say this, you’re the best spokesman for X3 that there could be. Part of this conversation has convinced me. I mean, I’m buying the X3, right? This weekend after speaking-

Dr. John Jaquish: Awesome.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah. After speaking with you, and honestly, I did a fair bit of research on you in order to have this conversation and just seeing everything you’ve described, you don’t have to sell the X3, you don’t have to promote it. Like you said, if you’re intelligent, then how could you be training any other way going forward?

Dr. John Jaquish: No, all people have to do is listen or read. Even sort of the sideways hat, bodybuilder guy, bodybuilder fan, there’s a lot of guys like that, that are kind of higher-level trained guys that hang out at Chris Bell’s Gym.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Yeah, Chris Bell.

Dr. John Jaquish: Chris Bell’s Gym Super Training in Sacramento. Like sometimes there’ll be like, I see your ads, your product just seems really stupid to me. And I’m like, well, tell me why. And they really don’t have a reason. They’re just like, well, you need weights. And I’m like, prove it, show me the study on that, that you need weights. You don’t need weights. Your central nervous system doesn’t know weight. But what it does know is capacity and range of motion, which weights completely do not address, in fact, go against. And so, they’re like, okay, I’m listening. And then after I explain it, they’re like, where do I get one? I get every time, where do I get one?

Lawrence Rosenberg: Right. That’s brilliant, that’s great. Well, I’m going to look forward to getting it, look forward to using it. And I hope when the book comes out, you’ll come on the show again.

Dr. John Jaquish: I will do it, definitely. This is a great show. You had great questions. I love them.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Thank you so much, Dr.

Dr. John Jaquish: Awesome, bye.

Lawrence Rosenberg: It’s awesome speaking to you.

Dr. John Jaquish: Thanks so much.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Have a great weekend.

Dr. John Jaquish: You too.

Lawrence Rosenberg: Thank you.

Dr. John Jaquish: All right. Bye, bye.

PART 4 OF 4 ENDS [01:42:50]

May 11, 2020

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